V.K. Viswanathan

Associate Professor
V.K. Viswanathan
626-7687
ACBS, Rm. 227

1117 E. Lowell St.

The Viswanathan laboratory is interested in the interactions between pathogenic bacteria and host cells. Specifically, the study of mechanisms by which enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and related bacteria cause disease. Recent studies have focused on the mechanisms by which these pathogens manipulate the survival of host cells. On a broader level, Viswanathan is interested in understanding how these pathogens are disseminated in the environment, and to eventually seek methods to control their spread.

Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor
 
School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences
University of Arizona
1117 E. Lowell Street Rm 207
Tucson, AZ 85721-0090
Telephone: (520)-626-7687
Email vkv@email.arizona.edu
 
Research interests: Interactions between entric pathogens and host intestinal epithelial cells.  Bacterial pathogenesis and Innate immunity.
 
Research:  My laboratory is interested in the interactions between pathogenic bacteria and host cells. Specifically, we study the mechanisms by which enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (“spinach- or hamburger E. coli”) and related bacteria cause disease. After attaching to epithelial cells in the intestine, these bacteria inject specific molecules into these cells via a specialized structure called the type III secretion system. The injected molecules specifically alter the biology of the host cells, presumably to support bacterial survival. We are interested in understanding the molecular alterations in the host cells resulting from these injected molecules, and how this eventually contributes to disease. Our studies also demonstrate that pathogenic E. coli suppress the death of host cells. Being extracellular pathogens, killing the host cell would likely result in a loss of the substratum thereby interfering with the ability to colonize. Our recent studies have focused on the mechanisms by which these pathogens manipulate the survival of host cells. On a broader level, we are interested in understanding how these pathogens are disseminated in the environment, and to eventually seek methods to control their spread.
 
Courses Taught:      
MIC/VSC 595A                Critical Evaluation of Scientific Literature (Spring)
MIC/VSC 421B (421L)     Microbial Techniques (Fall 2010)
MIC/VSC 420/520           Pathogenic Bacteriology (Fall 2011)
IMB565                           Principles & Mol. Mechnsms of Microbe-Host Interactions (Guest         lectures)
 
Selected Publications:
 
1. Epithelial maturity influences EPEC-induced desmosomal alterations. Roxas JL, Vedantam G, Viswanathan VK. Gut microbes. 2018; :1-5.

2. An Engineered Synthetic Biologic Protects Against Clostridium difficile Infection. Vedantam G, Kochanowsky J, Lindsey J, Mallozzi M, Roxas JL, Adamson C, Anwar F, Clark A, Claus-Walker R, Mansoor A, McQuade R, Monasky RC, Ramamurthy S, Roxas B, Viswanathan VK. Frontiers in microbiology. 2018; 9:2080.

3. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli EspH-Mediated Rho GTPase Inhibition Results in Desmosomal Perturbations. Roxas JL, Monasky RC, Roxas BAP, Agellon AB, Mansoor A, Kaper JB, Vedantam G, Viswanathan VK. Cellular and molecular gastroenterology and hepatology. 2018; 6(2):163-180

4. Modulation of Intestinal Paracellular Transport by Bacterial Pathogens. Roxas JL, Viswanathan VK. Comprehensive Physiology. 2018; 8(2):823-842

 

For a complete list of publications, please see:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/43903862/?sort=date&direction=descending

Courses Taught: 
IMB565
ACBS420/520
ACBS421B/421L
ACBS428R
ACBS595A
MIC430
MIC438